5 Tips For Your Crowdfunding Campaign Page

By Justine Alford

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If you’re crowdfunding for your research, you’re likely sick and tired of trying to convince people why your work is deserving of money. But creating a good campaign page needn’t be as laborious or tedious as grant applications; in fact, you might even enjoy writing it because it gets you to consider your research from a new perspective. And it’s your space, so use it as an opportunity to really showcase what you’re doing and sell it to the public.

Your work is exciting, you know that, but how are you going to convince others to think the same way? We’ve come up with some tips to help you with this important part of your campaign, so that hopefully your crowdfunding venture is as successful as it deserves to be! We’ve also written various other articles to help you on your way to success, so make sure to check out the “crowdfunding tips” section of our blog!

1: Tell A Story

This may seem fairly basic, but structuring your page logically will make the text flow better so that it’s easier to read and understand. If you lose people at the start by not introducing the project properly and giving it some context, then you’ll struggle to get people interested.

The “beginning” part of your story should offer some background – what’s the current situation, what are the issues within the field? You have only about 10 seconds to hook readers, so make your first few sentences impactful; don’t waffle, just get straight to the point.

In the “middle,” you need to introduce the solution, i.e. your research. What are you hoping to achieve, what can you bring to the table, and why is your work important? Try and bring in the reader here by thinking of ways, whether direct or indirect, that this work could ultimately affect them, or the world they live in.

Finally, at the end, you need to say what you need and why. How much are you asking for, and where exactly is that going? Try not to be too vague here and just say “we need £X for this project,” as people will want to know that their money is being well-spent. It would also be good to touch on the struggles of getting funding for research, so people understand the need for crowdfunding.

2: Show People Who You Are

After you’re done introducing the project, it’s important that you include a section on you and your team. We want to make sure you get the recognition you deserve and boost your network, so this is a really good way to break down the barriers between you/science, and the public.

If the campaign is faceless, it’s more difficult for people to share your passion. So show them that you’re more than just a stereotypical scientist, and are a likeable person. More importantly, explain what drives you to do your research and what makes you qualified to do it; tell people about your background and experience, and how that’ll make the project successful.

3: Ditch The Jargon

You want to appeal to as many people as possible, and the majority of the public aren’t experts in science. So don’t fill the text with complicated and off-putting science words; strip it back to its bare bones and only explain what you need to to get your point across. It’s not a grant application, so people don’t need to know the ins and outs of different scientific techniques, etc!

4: Remember Your Audience

Keep your audience at the forefront of your mind while drafting your campaign page. Think about who you’re addressing: are you aiming your campaign towards the general public, or perhaps a certain group of people, say environmentalists, parents, young people, etc. This will dictate the language and tone that you use. Put yourself in your readers’ shoes: what would they want to hear? For instance, if you’re crowdfunding for medical research, you could maybe include some words from someone affected by a particular health condition to help put the study into context.

5: Break Up The Text

A simple one, but important nonetheless. Confronting readers with big blocks of text is off-putting because it immediately puts them in the mindset that the read requires a lot of effort and concentration. People are often busy, so make your page less of a task by breaking up the text in two ways: using images and catchy subheadings.

With regards to the former, eye-catching images can help bring a sterile-looking page to life, keep the reader interested and help your audience understand what you’re talking about. Developing a new piece of tech? Show people the progress you’ve made! Taken some awesome microscope pictures? Include them!

There’s no real secret when it comes to the latter, but don’t overlook their importance as a way to maintain reader interest. Keep them short, snappy, and don’t include any jargon.

We hope you’ve found these tips helpful and use them to your advantage. It may seem like there’s a lot to consider, but just remember why you’re doing this, and your passion should effuse.

Good luck!

2 Comments

  1. MICHAEL PHILLIPS

    I want to contribute £20 by my Paypal a/c

    How can I do this?

    thanks Michael Phillips

    • Natalie Jonk

      Hello, we can accept payments via paypal, please can you email info@walacea.com and we will arrange a form for you to complete, alternatively you pay using Stripe which is the payment gateway that is integrated with the website. Best wishes, Natalie

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